QVS

Quincy Valley School, located on 13th Avenue Southwest, will close permanently at the end of the school year.

After positively impacting about 300 students over 13 years of service to the Quincy Area, the Quincy Valley School will close at the end of the 2019-2020 school year.

The QVS School Board sent a letter on April 20 to parents explaining why the school would be closing its doors. Due to declining student numbers over the past few years and the uncertainty surrounding COVID-19, QVS did not want to put undue hardship on parents by increasing tuition in order to cover the costs needed to keep the quality of the education at the level they had been providing in the past.

The Quincy Valley School was founded in 2007 by Warren and Heather Morgan. The goal of the school was to help children achieve their highest potential through solid academics in a supportive environment for the leaders of tomorrow.

QVS offered a choice in education for the community of Quincy. Every child is different; they learn and interact differently. QVS allowed for parents to have a choice in which option they felt better catered to their child’s needs and individuality.

“Quincy Valley School is unique because in its smallness it allowed me, as a teacher, to be a part of every child’s life, not only their education. I would often meet the students as young children and watch them grow into adolescents. Growth can be messy, but it is extremely rewarding,” Headmaster Sara Tuttle said. “QVS was a family.”

According to Tuttle, some characteristics QVS strived for and attained the majority of the time:

Individualized– Teachers think of each individual when planning and teaching. Curriculum was individualized and student driven, so students learned at their level. Teachers often rewrote lesson plans to incorporate an individual’s interest or need.

Respectful – There was mutual respect between all persons on campus. Students opened doors for each other and adults. Students stopped and helped each other when they saw someone was hurt or sad.

Safe – QVS was a place where students were able to grow because they felt safe. Students were able to step out of their comfort zone and try something new because they were encouraged and given the time to learn new concepts/skills.

Love and Laughter – QVS was filled with both love and laughter. We enjoyed each other and truly cherished the days we spent together.

Each month the students would work on a community project, which they called QVS Serves. This year, QVS students helped at the Quincy Food Bank, had lunch with the community members at the Senior Center, made Christmas trees for all hospice care patients in Grant County, sang songs at The Cambridge, and so much more. Past service projects included raking leaves for senior citizens, picking up litter around town and in the countryside, gathering food and Christmas gifts for the community, making art projects with and reading to residents at The Cambridge, and putting together Christmas boxes for deployed service men and women.

“At the end of the day, at the end of the year, I would hope the students would walk away from QVS knowing they can make a difference in the world. Their virtue and determination will proceed their hopes and goals,” Tuttle said.

The QVS staff, board, and founders would like to thank the Quincy community for the support they have given Quincy Valley School over the last 13 years.

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